ximchan:

*sobs into forever*

ximchan:

*sobs into forever*

lapiny:

haha.. o<-<

nubbsgalore:

fireflies in timelapse, photos by (click pic) vincent bradytakehito miyataketsuneaki hiramatsu and spencer black

We are weak, yet we can change.

batcii:

smoo told me to draw zutara week stuff so instead i drew some modern au gaang. sorry for my shitty handwriting.

note-a-bear:

socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Okay whatever “logic”But can we please now stop acting like being concerned for other people is a failing, since now it meets that precious “logic” requirement?

note-a-bear:

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Okay whatever “logic”
But can we please now stop acting like being concerned for other people is a failing, since now it meets that precious “logic” requirement?

iwillstillopenthewindow:

professor: bring a picture of the person that you love

me: excellent which one should I print out

image

She’s trying to stay composed, since she’s our captain. She’s waiting until she’s out of sight.

sokkascactusjuice:

Top 5 Episodes Per Season » Book One: Water

Chapter 10: Jet

"Sokka’s just jealous because he doesn’t have an arrow."

sokkascactusjuice:

Top 5 Episodes Per Season » Book 2: Earth

Chapter 7: Zuko Alone

My name is Zuko. Son of Ursa and Fire Lord Ozai and heir to the throne!”

sokkascactusjuice:

Top 5 Episodes Per Season » Book One: Water

Chapter 20: Siege of the North, Part 2

"I don’t need luck, though. I don’t want it. I’ve always had to struggle and fight, and that’s made me strong. It made me who I am."

captaingalaga:

I can’t be the only one

captaingalaga:

I can’t be the only one

© str-wrs